Italian public archaeology on fieldwork: an overview

Italian public archaeology on fieldwork: an overview

Francesco Ripanti University of Pisa |  francesco.ripanti@fileli.unipi.it Abstract In recent years, Italian field archaeology has displayed a growing interest in civic engagement. Several ongoing excavation projects have shown both benefits and drawbacks of developing a closer collaboration with non-archaeologists. Through creative and original public outreach activities they have certainly succeeded in reaching different audiences, but problems still remain: there is neither a shared methodology, nor a solid academic background and debate. Is there such a thing, thus, as Italian public archaeology? This paper addresses this crucial question by looking closely at a variety of outreach activities developed by a few Italian excavation projects, and contextualizing them in the framework of public archaeology studies from a global perspective. Keywords Public archaeology, Italy, field archaeology, excavation, outreach activities. Introduction In 2009, Chiara Bonacchi...
Read More
April 12th, 1204: Constantinople under siege

April 12th, 1204: Constantinople under siege

Francesco Ripanti Center for Public Archaeology Studies ‘Archeostorie’ |  f.ripanti@archeostoriejpa.eu Eugene Delacroix, Entry of the Crusaders in Constantinople (Source: Wikimedia Commons, - The Yorck Project: 10.000 Meisterwerke der Malerei. DVD-ROM, 2002. ISBN 3936122202. Distributed by DIRECTMEDIA Publishing GmbH., Public Domain) Monday, April 12th, 1204. The decisive day. Either they would be able to penetrate into the city in the coming hours, or else their failure would be definitive. Such were the thoughts of Peter of Amiens — a member of Hugh of Saint Pol’s party — as  he navigated up the tranquil waters of the Golden Horn aboard a Venetian ship. The closer he came to the seaward walls of Constantinople, the more his gaze became focused, and a certain greed arose in his eyes. The red cross...
Read More
Living archaeology at the Archaeodrome

Living archaeology at the Archaeodrome

Francesco Ripanti Center for Public Archaeology Studies ‘Archeostorie’ |  f.ripanti@archeostoriejpa.eu A second lot of the Poggibonsi Archaeodrome was inaugurated on Saturday, January 16, 2016. For those unfamiliar, the term ‘archaeodrome’ indicates a place where archaeology becomes alive and narrates itself, allowing people to interact with a past scientifically re-created according to the methods of experimental archaeology. Here two solemn funerary ceremonies take place, a few minutes apart from each other. A Lombard first, then a Frank: two different stories developing under the eyes of the same clump of silent, attentive people. The deceased are kindly laid in their final resting place, the objects that accompany them in the afterlife carefully arranged on their sides, the last rites celebrated. When the ceremonies are over, we got back to...
Read More