Editorial

Editorial

Cinzia Dal Maso Center for Public Archaeology Studies ‘Archeostorie’ |  c.dalmaso@archeostoriejpa.eu Keywords Public archaeology, Archeostorie, citizen science, dialogue, storytelling. Photo by Teodoro Teodoracopulos Here we are. At last. Now our Archeostorie. Journal of Public Archaeology is a reality and we are proud to present the first issue. The whole Editorial Board worked hard to reach this goal, overcoming difficulties, obstacles, and incidental delays. It was by no means an easy job, but our motivation was too strong to give up: we hold the deep conviction that this Journal is an undeniable necessity. Public archaeology has become increasingly popular in Italy: the word is on everyone’s lips both in archaeology seminars and university courses, and many archaeologists are starting to share their results with the wider public and actively collaborate with...
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Watching the world with Blu’s eyes

Watching the world with Blu’s eyes

Cinzia Dal Maso Center for Public Archaeology Studies ‘Archeostorie’ |  c.dalmaso@archeostoriejpa.eu Blu is poetry – there is no better way to describe it. It is an enchanting and rapturing elegy. Designed to advertise and promote the Livorno Province Museums, this short film has slowly but surely turned into a masterpiece. Andrea Camerini, the film’s only author (apart from the beautiful, dreamy soundtrack by Roberto Sbolci) put his heart and soul into it, expressing not only a deep love and respect for his own land, but also, and especially, the purest amazement at the wonders it has to offer. The astonished eyes of Nico, the protagonist of this wonderful journey, are Camerini’s own eyes, just as the author’s curiosity is expressed by Nico’s dog, whose craving for...
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Warship battering rams on display in Favignana

Warship battering rams on display in Favignana

Cinzia Dal Maso Archeostorie |  c.dalmaso@archeostoriejpa.eu Eleven Roman battering rams have been recovered from a stretch of sea northwest of the Island of Levanzo, off the Sicilian coast. With a twelfth ram still lying on the seabed, it is the biggest-ever recovery of its kind. All the finds come from the location where, on March 10th, 241 BC, two hundred Roman ships defeated the more massive Carthaginian fleet in the so-called Battle of the Egadi Islands. The battle is regarded as a momentous time in Roman history: it was the last clash of the First Punic War, marking at the same time the beginning of Carthage’s decline and of Rome’s rise to global power. Before then, Rome had been a land-based State that had succeeded in...
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